Fashion World Mourns Death of Yves Saint Laurent

Revered and Remembered: Yves Saint Laurent


As the fashion world mourns the loss of one of its most talented and influential icons, our network partners pay tribute with an outpouring of content. Their reflections, retrospectives, and photos of the designer, his work, and the women who wore it are wrapped up for you below. Whether or not you've ever worn Yves Saint Laurent yourself, most of us can agree that his designs heralded a change in direction that was both liberating and revolutionary, and the effects of which were felt from Paris to mass market retailers.

Ma Petite Chou and Fashion Projects tip us off to a YSL retrospective exhibit at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, which will run through September 28.

The Shoe Goddess offers a timeline of important events and milestones in the designer's life and career, and We Are the Market nicely summarizes his most significant achievements.

The Coveted reflects on the YSL paper doll collection that was among her earliest fashion influences.

Hope Robertson finds YSL pieces at Bluefly.

From the fragrance camp, The Scented Salamander reminds us that his reach extended beyond fashion, as the cult following that developed around his luxury perfumes can attest, as well as the groundbreaking marketing tactics used in his ad campaigns.

Shoe Blog rounds up YSL footwear finds and feels that his work is now more relevant that ever.

Debutante Clothing points out that YSL's talents lay not only in his sartorial skills, but also in his ability to understand and interpret Ready-to-Wear from a business perspective and in terms of customers' needs.

Style Bubble revisits the book The Beautiful Fall, which chronicles a friendship between the designer and Karl Largerfeld that turned into a fierce rivalry, and questions what YSL's death will mean in those terms.

Chic Alert and Cult of Couture have a great black and white video from 1962, in which his collection is being hotly discussed. It offers glimpses of the designer backstage as he prepares the looks, as well as famous persons of the era anticipating the show.

The Business of Fashion points out the many ways in which YSL was an innovator, from being the first to use black models on the runway to being the first to license his name to other businesses.

SlamxHype and Poetic and Chic both have a great black and white photo of the designer standing in his storefront wearing one of his safari jackets, a style he invented.

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