Marc Jacobs On What Hurts His Feelings, What's Currently Turning His Gears

Marc Jacobs On What Hurts His Feelings, What's Currently Turning His Gears


>> Marc Jacobs
and his longtime business partner Robert Duffy have a unique relationship, which while the two chat in the September 2010 issue of Interview, Jacobs describes as thus: "I think anything that affects you [Duffy] affects me. I am Marc Jacobs by birth, but we are Marc Jacobs by the company we built."

Jacobs also speaks to what has worked his mind recently — perhaps there's some potential Spring 2011 inspiration in there? "I don't know much about classical music, but I've been enjoying listening to it lately. I find it very calming and with my energy not being as high as it often is, I guess I've just been enjoying the beauty of different composers. In terms of visuals, contemporary art stimulates me the most, although in working on the new [West Village] house, I've been antique shopping, looking at rugs and fabrics for interiors, and so I've been looking at a lot of interior magazines. I find gorgeous rooms to be extremely arousing at the moment."

On all the attention: "If we built a pile of crap then nobody would care what I ate for lunch." »

Duffy asks Jacobs to give his "honest take" on New York fashion, to which he replies: "I feel like you and I have always felt a little bit outside of a community, or at least, speaking for myself, I have felt like that. There are other designers there who I respect in terms of their work, but I feel like we operate in our own world. We've never followed the same path, like to show at the tents or have a store in a certain neighorhood. We've always followed the beat of our own drum. We moved downtown before other people did and we showed at the Armory while everyone else was showing at one central location. I don't think we did it to be rebellious. We just did what we wanted to do."

And they also chat about whether Marc's celebrity and approach to courting the media has ever backfired. Marc admits: "I like being out there. As I've said before, I love attention. Sometimes that attention is great, like when we get get attention for doing a great show or our sales are good or even attention for walking down the street and looking sexy. That's all great. But unfortunately along with that comes a lot of negative comments: 'Oh, we miss the old Marc.' 'It was much better when he was grungy.' Da, da, da, da . . . Sometimes it hurts my feelings, but basically I'm really happy with the attention that we get. It's more work-related than what I'm going through in my personal life. If people weren't interested in the work then they wouldn't really care about my personal life. So I think about it logically. The attention toward me is basically because of what we've built as a company. If we built a pile of crap then nobody would care what I ate for lunch. We live in a world where people are really hungry for information, and they're not hungry for information on subjects that they're not interested in."

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